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Scott Spence

Adding real-time analytics to my SvelteKit site with Fathom

22 min read
Hey! Thanks for stopping by! Just a word of warning, this post is over 1 year old, . If there's technical information in here it's more than likely out of date.

I spent a bit of time the other day looking into the Fathom Analytics API, this was something I took a look at around a year ago now, but I didn’t really get around to using it.

If you’re looking to implement Fathom analytics on your site, I updated a post over 1 year ago on Fathom Analytics with SvelteKit which details the process.

It also incorporates the Fathom API for real time page views. So if you’re looking to do that, check out that post and the github repo!

Well, now I have got round to using it! If you’re on this site now and you’re not using something like uBlock Origin, you’ll probably see the live counter of people on this page right now under the tags!

If not you can scroll to the bottom of this page and depending on how long this post is into the future (I may have scrapped it, you know!) there’ll be an analytics section where you can see how may people have been on this page.

Ok so if you want a privacy focused analytics solution, Fathom, in my biased opinion, is the best one out there.

Seriously, if you’re looking for a privacy first analytics option check it out! Also while you’re at it use my referral code! It will help me out and you’re welcome for putting you onto an awesome product!

FYI Fathom Analytics is a paid service, well worth the money in my opinion.

If you’ve not seen any of my previous content check out the analytics tag on the site here! I’ve written about them a ton in the past and you can probably tell by now that I really love the product.

Anyways! Preamble over, let’s get into how I did it.

Implementation

I’ll be documenting the implementation for the SvelteKit and fathom GitHub project that is detailed in the Fathom Analytics with SvelteKit post, the approach is the same for this site.

If you want to take a look at the code for the project you can check out the before and after branches I’ve created on the repo, here’s the diff so you can take a look at what’s changed.

In the following sections I’ll be detailing how to get current visitors on the site and individual page analytics.

The Fathom API

The Fathom API is still (from what I can tell) early access, so you’ll need to email them to get access to it. You’ll be notified when it’s ready with instructions on how to get started.

The Fathom API documentation in their own words is absolutely gorgeous and I agree.

Once you get API access you wil be able to go to app.usefathom.com/api and generate an API token. There’s several options, Admin key, All sites read only key and Site-specific key. The site specific and read only key option is to my mind the most sensible option.

With all the options available Fathom have basically opened up the whole API here so you can create your own analytics reporting dashboard if you want!

Fathom API key

Before I start trying to access the API I’ll need to generate an API key. To do this, I’ll pop on over to app.usefathom.com/api click ‘Create new’, name the key ideal-memory-read-only for the permissions I’ll select ‘Site specific key’ and select the site to have the key for, (which is ideal-memory.com), check the ‘Read’ access then click ‘Save changes’.

I already have a pre-existing .env file so I’ll add an entry to it for the FATHOM_API_KEY I just generated.

Current visitors analytics

To get the current visitors to a site I’ll make an endpoint to hit the Fathom API, I’ll do that by creating a +server.js endpoint to call out to, in my implementation I’ll call it current-visitors.json and it’s located in the src/routes folder.

So, I’ll create the folder and the server file from the terminal.

# create the folder
mkdir src/routes/current-visitors.json
# then the server file
touch src/routes/current-visitors.json/+server.ts

The routes folder looks like this now:

├── routes
│   ├── about
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── blog
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── contact
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── current-visitors.json
│   │   └── +server.js
│   ├── pricing
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── services
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── +layout.svelte
│   └── +page.svelte

In the +server.ts file I’ll create a GET request handler to call the Fathom API.

import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async () => {
  return json({
    visitors: 0,
  })
}

This is the basic outline of the GET request and I’m using the SvelteKit json helper to return the data as JSON.

If I spin up the dev server and go to /current-visitors.json on localhost I’ll see the following JSON response.

{ "visitors": 0 }

This is eventually going to return the current visitors to the site. If we take a look at the Fathom API documentation we can see that the current_visitors endpoint takes the site_id as a query parameter, here’s the curl request to get it from the documentation.

curl https://api.usefathom.com/v1/current_visitors /
-H "Authorization: Bearer API_TOKEN_HERE" /
-d site_id=ABCDEFG /
-G

So, I’ll make a fetch request to the Fathom API and pass in the site_id as a query parameter along with the Authorization header, both of which are from the .env file. One is private FATHOM_API_KEY the other is public PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID both using the $env module.

You can read up more about using the $env module with the SvelteKit Environment Variables with the SvelteKit $env Module post I updated a while back.

I’ll wrap the fetch request with the Authorization header in a try catch block and return the data from the API as JSON.

import { FATHOM_API_KEY } from '$env/static/private'
import { PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID } from '$env/static/public'
import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async () => {
  try {
    const headers_auth = new Headers()
    headers_auth.append(`Authorization`, `Bearer ${FATHOM_API_KEY}`)
    const res = await fetch(
      `https://api.usefathom.com/v1/current_visitors?site_id=${PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID}&detailed=true`,
      {
        headers: headers_auth,
      }
    )

    let data = await res.json()

    return json({
      visitors: data,
    })
  } catch (error) {
    return json({
      error: `Error: ${error}`,
      status: 500,
    })
  }
}

Sweet! Now I can see the current visitors to the site. To test it quickly I’ll go to ideal-memory.com and select the contact page. Over on localhost I’ll refresh the current-visitors.json endpoint and I get the following JSON response.

{
  "visitors": {
    "total": 1,
    "content": [
      {
        "hostname": "https://www.ideal-memory.com",
        "pathname": "/contact",
        "total": "1"
      }
    ],
    "referrers": []
  }
}

Aight! I can now use this in the project somewhere to show the current visitors to the site.

The ideal-memory.com site is a bit basic, so rather than create a footer and place the current visitors there I’ll add it to the navbar so it’s in plain sight of visitors.

To do that I’ll first need to call the current-visitors.json API endpoint from a +layout.server.ts file and pass the data from that to the nav component.

Create the +layout.server.ts file:

touch src/routes/+layout.server.ts

Then in the +layout.server.ts file I’ll create a load function to call the current-visitors.json API endpoint and return the visitors.

import type { LayoutServerLoad } from './$types'

export const load: LayoutServerLoad = async ({ fetch }) => {
  const fetch_visitors = async () => {
    const res = await fetch(`../current-visitors.json`)
    const { visitors } = await res.json()
    return visitors
  }

  return {
    visitors: fetch_visitors(),
  }
}

The data returned from the +layout.server.ts, load function is then available to child +layout.svelte components.

In the +layout.svelte file I can accept the visitors data:

import type { PageData } from './$types'

export let data: PageData

Then pass that to the nav component.

<Nav visitors={data?.visitors.total} />

I’ve hidden the full file contents behind some buttons, you can click on them to check out how the files look.

Add a visitors prop to the nav component:

export let visitors: number

Which I can use in the navbar end:

<div class="navbar-end">
  <p
    class="text-sm font-semibold cursor-pointer rounded-xl bg-secondary px-2 tracking-wide text-secondary-content"
  >
    {visitors} Live Visitors
  </p>
</div>

This is what the navbar looks like now:

That’s it for this section. Now onto getting the page analytics.

Page analytics

Ok, so in this section things will get a bit more intense! Why? Because there’s a lot of parameters that need passing to the Fathom API to get the aggregations for the page analytics.

So, let’s take this a step at a time.

As before, I’ll make an endpoint this time for analytics.json and create a +server.js file for the API call.

# create the folder
mkdir src/routes/analytics.json
# then the server file
touch src/routes/analytics.json/+server.ts

Now this is how the routes folder looks:

├── routes
│   ├── about
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── analytics.json
│   │   └── +server.js
│   ├── blog
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── contact
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── current-visitors.json
│   │   └── +server.js
│   ├── pricing
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── services
│   │   └── +page.svelte
│   ├── +layout.svelte
│   └── +page.svelte

Same again, I’ll make a simple GET request handler in the +server.ts file and return analytics.

import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async () => {
  return json({
    analytics: 0,
  })
}

As before I can visit the endpoint to validate it’s working, I’ll go to the localhost on my dev server for /analytics.json and validate it’s working:

{ "analytics": 0 }

Cool, cool, cool, now, with the easy part out of the way it’s time to take a look at the Fathom API docs!

Let’s take a look at the most basic request to the API for pageviews, here’s the curl request in the Fathom docs:

curl https://api.usefathom.com/v1/aggregations /
  -H "Authorization: Bearer API_TOKEN_HERE" /
  -d entity="pageview" /
  -d entity_id="CDBUGS" /
  -d aggregates="pageviews" /
  -G

You’ll notice this time there’s no site_id and instead this time it’s an entity_id.

I’ll fold that into the +server.ts file now adding in the entity, entity_id and aggregates values from the curl request along with the PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID to identify the site:

import { FATHOM_API_KEY } from '$env/static/private'
import { PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID } from '$env/static/public'
import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async () => {
  try {
    const headers_auth = new Headers()
    headers_auth.append(`Authorization`, `Bearer ${FATHOM_API_KEY}`)
    const res = await fetch(
      `https://api.usefathom.com/v1/aggregations?entity=pageview&entity_id=${PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID}&aggregates=pageviews`,
      {
        headers: headers_auth,
      }
    )

    let data = await res.json()

    return json({
      analytics: data,
    })
  } catch (error) {
    return json({
      error: `Error: ${error}`,
      status: 500,
    })
  }
}

That gives me a response of:

{ "analytics": [{ "pageviews": "1162" }] }

That’s total pageviews for all time for the site, but I want to get the pageviews for the year, so I’ll add in date_from and date_to parameters and also a date_grouping one. I’ll add in the dates from the start of the year to the end of the year and have the grouping as year:

import { FATHOM_API_KEY } from '$env/static/private'
import { PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID } from '$env/static/public'
import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async () => {
  try {
    const headers_auth = new Headers()
    headers_auth.append(`Authorization`, `Bearer ${FATHOM_API_KEY}`)
    const res = await fetch(
      `https://api.usefathom.com/v1/aggregations?entity=pageview&entity_id=${PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID}&aggregates=pageviews&date_from=2023-01-01T00:00:00.000Z&date_to=2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z&date_grouping=year`,
      {
        headers: headers_auth,
      }
    )

    let data = await res.json()

    return json({
      analytics: data,
    })
  } catch (error) {
    return json({
      error: `Error: ${error}`,
      status: 500,
    })
  }
}

Refreshing the endpoint on the dev server gives me:

{ "analytics": [{ "pageviews": "647", "date": "2023" }] }

So now, if I change the start year from 2023 to 2021 I get:

{
  "analytics": [
    { "pageviews": "647", "date": "2023" },
    { "pageviews": "492", "date": "2022" },
    { "pageviews": "23", "date": "2021" }
  ]
}

Page views grouped by year, pretty neat right!?

Refine the analytics parameters

Those query parameters in the fetch for the analytics is super long right? What I’ll now is, rather than hard code in the parameters I’ll pass an object to the fetch request.

I’ll keep the same parameters as before, but I’ll create a new default_params object and pass that to the fetch request via a function to build the URL with the query parameters in it.

Let’s take a quick look at the function to do that, I’ll create somewhere for it to go first though, I could just co-locate it in the analytics.json/+server.ts file, but I’ll create a new folder and file so it can be reused elsewhere if needed:

# create a new folder for the utils
mkdir src/lib/utils
# create a new file for the function
touch src/lib/utils/index.ts

The function will take in an object and return a query string, joining the key and value from the object being passed in with an = and joining all the entries with an &:

export const object_to_query_params = (
  obj: { [s: string]: unknown } | ArrayLike<unknown>
) => {
  const params = Object.entries(obj).map(
    ([key, value]) => `${key}=${value}`
  )
  return '?' + params.join('&')
}

Let’s do a quick example of how that would work then. So, let’s take the parameters used in the last example and add them to the default_params object:

const default_params = {
  entity: 'pageview',
  entity_id: PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID,
  aggregates: 'pageviews',
  date_from: '2021-01-01T00:00:00.000Z',
  date_to: '2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z',
  date_grouping: 'year',
}

Passing that into the object_to_query_params function will return:

?entity=pageview&entity_id=CDBUGS&aggregates=pageviews&date_from=2021-01-01T00:00:00.000Z&date_to=2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z&date_grouping=year

I’ll break that up a bit so it’s readable and I hope you get the idea of what’s going on here:

?entity=pageview
&entity_id=CDBUGS
&aggregates=pageviews
&date_from=2021-01-01T00:00:00.000Z
&date_to=2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z
&date_grouping=year

So, I know I’ve just shifted the hard coded parameters from one place to another, but these are some base defaults to use and they can be replaced with variables, I’ll come onto that shortly.

For now what I want to do is set some more aggregates, currently there’s just the pageviews, I’m going to add visits, uniques, pageviews, avg_duration and bounce_rate.

const default_params = {
  entity: 'pageview',
  entity_id: PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID,
  aggregates: 'visits,uniques,pageviews,avg_duration,bounce_rate',
  date_from: '2021-01-01T00:00:00.000Z',
  date_to: '2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z',
  date_grouping: 'year',
}

Now I refresh the dev server and see what I get from the API now:

{
  "analytics": [
    {
      "visits": "99",
      "uniques": "140",
      "pageviews": "681",
      "avg_duration": "55.5731",
      "bounce_rate": 0.2828282828282828,
      "date": "2023"
    },
    {
      "visits": "145",
      "uniques": "202",
      "pageviews": "492",
      "avg_duration": "30.7709",
      "bounce_rate": 0.1310344827586207,
      "date": "2022"
    },
    {
      "visits": "4",
      "uniques": "5",
      "pageviews": "23",
      "avg_duration": "36.0909",
      "bounce_rate": 0.75,
      "date": "2021"
    }
  ]
}

Ok, so, now I’ve validated the aggregates, I’m going to remove the hardcoded dates and replace them with URL parameters.

In the +server.ts load function I’ll destructure out the url from the load function context object and use the searchParams property to get the date_from and date_to parameters:

export const GET: RequestHandler = async ({ url }) => {
  const date_from = url.searchParams.get('date_from') ?? null
  const date_to = url.searchParams.get('date_to') ?? null

  const default_params = {
    entity: 'pageview',
    entity_id: PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID,
    aggregates: 'visits,uniques,pageviews,avg_duration,bounce_rate',
    date_grouping: 'year',
  }

  try {
    const headers_auth = new Headers()
    headers_auth.append(`Authorization`, `Bearer ${FATHOM_API_KEY}`)
    const res = await fetch(
      `https://api.usefathom.com/v1/aggregations${object_to_query_params(
        default_params
      )}`,
      {
        headers: headers_auth,
      }
    )

    let data = await res.json()

    return json({
      analytics: data,
    })
  } catch (error) {
    return json({
      error: `Error: ${error}`,
      status: 500,
    })
  }
}

There’s an issue now with this approach as I have to add in some URL parameters on the local dev server to get the data I want.

From the localhost:5173/analytics.json (:5173 is the default local development port for Vite) endpoint I can add in the date_from and date_to parameters and see what I get:

http://localhost:5174/analytics.json?date_from=2021-01-01T00:00:00.000Z&date_to=2023-12-31T23:59:59.999Z

The result is the same as before, so, I know I’m getting the data I want by passing in the date_from and date_to parameters.

Now I have to make sure that every call to the API has the date URL parameters, not very flexible.

So, now instead of having the date_from and date_to in the default_params I’ll create a new object called date_params. I’ll conditionally add the parameters if they exist I’ll also toss in the date_grouping here.

I found this approach conditionally adding object properties on a Stack Overflow answer, pretty neat!

const date_params = {
  ...(date_from && { date_from }),
  ...(date_to && { date_to }),
  ...(date_grouping && { date_grouping }),
}

Then I can smoosh both the default_params and date_params together with the ES6 spread syntax.

const params = { ...default_params, ...date_params }

Then pass the params into the object_to_query_params function.

So now if I make a call to the /analytics.json endpoint without any parameters I get the lump total again:

{
  "analytics": [
    {
      "visits": "470",
      "uniques": "453",
      "pageviews": "2328",
      "avg_duration": "47.8992",
      "bounce_rate": 0.265824915584089
    }
  ]
}

Cool, cool! Now if I don’t add in any URL parameters I get the total data, if I add in the date_from and date_to parameters I get the data I want.

Here’s what the full +server.ts file for /analytics.json looks like now:

import { FATHOM_API_KEY } from '$env/static/private'
import { PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID } from '$env/static/public'
import { object_to_query_params } from '$lib/utils'
import { json } from '@sveltejs/kit'
import type { RequestHandler } from './$types'

export const GET: RequestHandler = async ({ url }) => {
  const date_from = url.searchParams.get('date_from') ?? null
  const date_to = url.searchParams.get('date_to') ?? null
  const date_grouping = url.searchParams.get('date_grouping') ?? null

  const date_params = {
    ...(date_from && { date_from }),
    ...(date_to && { date_to }),
    ...(date_grouping && { date_grouping }),
  }

  const default_params = {
    entity: 'pageview',
    entity_id: PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID,
    aggregates: 'visits,uniques,pageviews,avg_duration,bounce_rate',
  }

  const params = { ...default_params, ...date_params }

  try {
    const headers_auth = new Headers()
    headers_auth.append(`Authorization`, `Bearer ${FATHOM_API_KEY}`)
    const res = await fetch(
      `https://api.usefathom.com/v1/aggregations${object_to_query_params(
        params
      )}`,
      {
        headers: headers_auth,
      }
    )

    let data = await res.json()

    return json({
      analytics: data,
    })
  } catch (error) {
    return json({
      error: `Error: ${error}`,
      status: 500,
    })
  }
}

Ok, now in the next section I’ll add in page paths so that I can get detailed information on individual pages.

Getting specific page data

Up until now there’s only been information on the whole site, now I want to get specific page analytics.

I can do this by adding in some filters to the default_params object, remember this is hardcoded, you can pass whatever you want as query parameters to the endpoint, I just find that this is a nice set of defaults to use.

For these filters I’ll need to specify a field_grouping for the pathname which will be the page slug. Then in the filters I’ll specify the property to filter on as pathname with the operator: is and the value as the pathname I’ll pass in.

The default_params object will looks like this now:

const default_params = {
  entity: 'pageview',
  entity_id: PUBLIC_FATHOM_ID,
  aggregates: 'visits,uniques,pageviews,avg_duration,bounce_rate',
  field_grouping: 'pathname',
  filters: `[{"property": "pathname","operator": "is","value": "${pathname}"}]`,
}

I’ll need to pass in the pathname as a parameter to the endpoint, so in the GET function I’ll add in a variable to get the pathname from the URL:

const pathname = url.searchParams.get('pathname') ?? '/'

Aight! Sweet! I’m now set up to pass parameters to the endpoint.

So, now, for each page load I want to pass in the date range I want for the page analytics and the page path.

I’m going to add daily, month to date and year to date analytics for the pages.

As none of the pages in this project are dynamically generated I’ll use a +page.server.ts file for each route to request the data.

If the pages were dynamically generated this could be done in one file. As they’re not, I’ll create a utility function to create the query parameters passing in the pathname parameter.

So, in the page_analytics function I’m about to create, I’ll want to get the dates and times for the day_start, day_end, month_start, month_end, year_start and year_end variables.

Rather than faffing around with the Date object I’m going to use date-fns this has all the utility functions I need to do this.

pnpm i -D date-fns

In the src/lib/utils/index.ts where I’ll create the page_analytics function I’ll import the date-fns functions:

import {
  format,
  startOfDay,
  endOfDay,
  startOfMonth,
  endOfMonth,
  startOfYear,
  endOfYear,
} from 'date-fns'

Then I’ll create the page_analytics function, this will need to take in the base_path for the endpoint call that includes the page slug, so for the about page analytics.json?pathname=/about. I’ll also pass the fetch from the +page.server.ts to call the endpoint. I’ll come onto the +page.server.ts files in a bit.

For the Svelte fetch being passed I’ve used the VS Code helper to infer the type:

export const page_analytics = async (
  base_path: string,
  fetch: {
    (
      input: URL | RequestInfo,
      init?: RequestInit | undefined
    ): Promise<Response>
    (
      input: URL | RequestInfo,
      init?: RequestInit | undefined
    ): Promise<Response>
    (arg0: string): any
  }
) => {}

The add in the date variables:

const day_start = startOfDay(new Date()).toISOString()
const day_end = endOfDay(new Date()).toISOString()

const month_start = startOfMonth(new Date()).toISOString()
const month_end = endOfMonth(new Date()).toISOString()

const year_start = startOfYear(new Date()).toISOString()
const year_end = endOfYear(new Date()).toISOString()

Then create a functions to fetch_daily_visits, fetch_monthly_visits and fetch_yearly_visits I’ll show the example for fetch_daily_visits and return daily_visits.

const fetch_daily_visits = async () => {
  const res = await fetch(
    `${base_path}&date_from=${day_start}&date_to=${day_end}`
  )
  const { analytics } = await res.json()
  return analytics
}

return {
  daily_visits: fetch_daily_visits(),
}

Here’s what the full page_analytics function looks like:

I can now create a +page.server.ts file for each page and call the page_analytics function.

Create the +page.server.ts file for the about page:

touch src/routes/about/+page.server.ts

Then add in a load function and call the page_analytics function:

import { page_analytics } from '$lib/utils'
import type { PageServerLoad } from './$types'

export const load: PageServerLoad = async ({ fetch }) => {
  const base_path = `analytics.json?pathname=/about`

  let { daily_visits, monthly_visits, yearly_visits } =
    await page_analytics(base_path, fetch)

  return {
    daily_visits,
    monthly_visits,
    yearly_visits,
  }
}

Now to test this out I’ll add the daily_visits to the about page, I’ll need to accept the data prop then I can validate the data by dumping it out into a <pre> tag:

<script lang="ts">
  import type { PageData } from './$types'

  export let data: PageData
</script>

<pre>{JSON.stringify(data, null, 2)}</pre>

<svelte:head>
  <title>SvelteKit with Fathom | About</title>
</svelte:head>

<section
  class="prose-xl prose-h1:text-secondary prose-a:link-primary"
>
  <h1>About</h1>

  <p>This site was built to made to showcase Fathom Analytics.</p>
</section>

Looking at the about page I get the pre tag with the data:

{
  "visitors": {
    "total": 1,
    "content": [
      {
        "hostname": "http://localhost",
        "pathname": "/about",
        "total": "1"
      }
    ],
    "referrers": []
  },
  "daily_visits": [
    {
      "visits": "5",
      "uniques": "3",
      "pageviews": "132",
      "avg_duration": "66.4521",
      "bounce_rate": 0,
      "pathname": "/about"
    }
  ],
  "monthly_visits": [
    {
      "visits": "7",
      "uniques": "16",
      "pageviews": "192",
      "avg_duration": "46.9545",
      "bounce_rate": 0.14285714285714285,
      "date": "2023-02",
      "pathname": "/about"
    }
  ],
  "yearly_visits": [
    {
      "visits": "7",
      "uniques": "18",
      "pageviews": "194",
      "avg_duration": "46.1339",
      "bounce_rate": 0.14285714285714285,
      "date": "2023",
      "pathname": "/about"
    }
  ]
}

Success!!

Yes the visitors data is also in the page data variable, this is available as the layout file is a parent file to the page file.

I could be more specific and only destructure the data I need, but this is fine for now.

Ok, that’s it! All I need to do now is display the data on the page, I’ll use the daisyUI stats component to do this.

I’ll create a component for the stats:

touch src/lib/components/analytics-card.svelte

Then in the component I’ll need to accept the analytics data as page_analytics and use the daisyUI classes to style the stats:

<script lang="ts">
  export let page_analytics: {
    date: string
    visits: number
    uniques: number
    pageviews: number
  }
</script>

<div
  class="stats stats-vertical mb-8 w-full border border-secondary shadow-lg md:stats-horizontal"
>
  <div class="stat">
    <div class="stat-title">Entries</div>
    <div class="stat-value text-2xl">
      {page_analytics?.visits}
    </div>
  </div>

  <div class="stat">
    <div class="stat-title">Visitors</div>
    <div class="stat-value text-2xl">
      {page_analytics?.uniques}
    </div>
  </div>

  <div class="stat">
    <div class="stat-title">Views</div>
    <div class="stat-value text-2xl">
      {page_analytics?.pageviews}
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Then in the about page I’ll import the component and pass in the data for each of the stats:

<script lang="ts">
  import { AnalyticsCard } from '$lib/components'
  import type { PageData } from './$types'

  export let data: PageData
</script>

<svelte:head>
  <title>SvelteKit with Fathom | About</title>
</svelte:head>

<section
  class="prose-xl prose-h1:text-secondary prose-a:link-primary"
>
  <h1>About</h1>

  <p>This site was built to made to showcase Fathom Analytics.</p>

  <p>Live Analytics for daily visits.</p>
  <AnalyticsCard page_analytics={data?.daily_visits[0]} />
  <p>Live Analytics for monthly visits.</p>
  <AnalyticsCard page_analytics={data?.monthly_visits[0]} />
  <p>Live Analytics for yearly visits.</p>
  <AnalyticsCard page_analytics={data?.yearly_visits[0]} />
</section>

I’ll repeat the same process for the other pages in the project, I’m not going to be posting any more code walls as it’s the same process for each page.

Done!

That’s it I implemented Fathom Analytics in a SvelteKit project for live visitors and individual page stats.

Google wants to crawl my API endpoint

One last thing, not related to implementing the analytics, this may happen to you or it may not. In my case however Google decided it didn’t want to crawl all the blog posts I have made since the start of the year and instead wanted to crawl the API endpoints I created.

If this is something you want to check for yourself then you can find if Google is trying to crawl your API endpoints by going to the Google Search Console selecting ‘Pages’, then in ‘Page indexing’ check to see if there are any entries for ‘Crawled - currently not indexed’.

There may be some entries for the endpoints.

To stop this I’ve added a Disallow: line for the endpoints in a robots.txt in the static folder of my SvelteKit project.

User-agent: *
Disallow: /analytics.json
Disallow: /current-visitors.json

I made a short post going into more detail for Robots.txt file for SvelteKit projects there’s a couple more things in there you may find useful.

Conclusion

I’ve implements Fathom Analytics on a pre-existing project using the Fathom Analytics API.

This means I can get real-time page views and current visitors the website.

The Fathom API is still in early access, contact them to get access to it.

This was just my implementation I hacked on over a weekend. The Fathom API could allow you create your own fully functional analytics reporting dashboard.

Finally, to prevent Google from crawling API endpoints, I added in a Disallow line in a robots.txt.

There's a reactions leaderboard you can check out too.

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